Landscape and Nature photography by Shane Srogi

On The Ranch

The Good Horse aka The Escape Artist

 (Shane Srogi)

 

The Good Horse

Woke up this morning to knocking and the words you don’t want to hear “The Horse Got Out!”

Immediately you want to rush out but do things slow, get your gloves and steel toed boots. Get carrots and a rope. Now go find her.

Did she get off the ranch? My heart is racing because that would be really bad, keep calm. You don’t want to be agitated when you find her. That will just increase her stress level.

Do a search a few minutes go by. There she is! In her old stomping grounds the big pasture. Animals go to places that are familiar. It’s been a year or more since she has been over there. She’s playing BIG horse snorting and puffing soooo lets just close the gate and let her run this out. But it’s hot so get her some water.

Once she’s had her fun and realized the grass is indeed not greener She’s safe to approach. Calmer, tired and thinking maybe it’s time to go back to my nice shady barn with a fan. That’s the time to lead her back with a generous helping of carrots of course. Carrots work better than a rope around the neck.

She’s napping now in the comfort of home out of the sun and heat.

Good Horse. Every now and then everyone needs adventures. It makes one feel alive. A wildthing……free to roam. Good Horse.


The Gloaming

 (Shane Srogi)

 

The Gloaming

The beauty of nature for a photographer is expressed in light.  Cameras like the Nikon D600 have become more finely tuned to the sensitivity of low light allowing artists to express the subtleties of natural light after the sun drops below the horizon.  Sometimes I think that photography as an art is just starting.


Clover Field II

 (Shane Srogi)

Clover Field II

The beauty of post processing in the Digital age is that you can readily retell the story in a photograph by going back and reprocessing the image.  Advances in personal technique and software can aid in this endeavor.  My photography is dynamic, I will always go back to the images……perhaps retelling their stories with a different emphasis.


No-One Sits in a Storm

 (Shane Srogi)

 

No-One Sits in a Storm


Daybreak

 (Shane Srogi)

“Daybreak”

Inland Fog in South Florida is a rarity.  I and count two days last winter. Quite a change from living on the Puget Sound in Seattle where a marine layer for fog was quite common.  Needless to say I jumped up and rushed out to shoot the Photographic Bonanza.  As the sun rose high enough in the sky to break through the clouds the sky  because alive with texture and just enough ground fog was left to give that atmospheric feeling.  Seconds before the sky was a nondescript grey haze.  Truly a wondrous “Daybreak”


It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it.

 (Shane Srogi)

It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it


Heading into the Wind

 (Shane Srogi)

Heading into the Wind

Horses on the Range in Florida head for shelter as a storm builds.


Rolling Storm

 (Shane Srogi)

Rolling Thunderstorm


Palomino Portrait

 (Shane Srogi)

Some images unfold before you very quickly.  I find that I draw on my Photojournalistic training more often then not.  It doesn’t matter if I’m shooting the fast changing light in a stormy landscape  or a wildlife shot of a bird fishing for dinner.  The decisive moment happens very quickly.  Be ready but be aware.  Know what’s going on around you but be able to concentrate your focus when things start happening.  Here I was taping a video photographic tip when the Palomino on the ranch heard me talking.  A very curious horse she came over to check the scene out for herself.  Not wanting to miss the shot I pulled my camera off the tripod got the horse’s fly mask off (it makes her look like a superhero) stepped to the side to recompose the shot.  I got one frame and she was gone.  30 seconds total, 3 seconds before she left.  She walked away with a carrot I walked away with a shot that I’m very pleased with.


Bird of Paradise

 (Shane Srogi)

One of the more dramatic first signs of spring here on the Ranch.  The flowering Bird of Paradise.  Shot well into twilight this image is a perfect example of  “keep shooting after the sun sets.”  The blues and purples of the flower came alive.  The textures of the pod.  The pearl quality of the  flower takes on a metallic look.  There is an almost Alien Movie quality at work here.  The pod is ful a sweet sticky goo syrup.  Alien might be the right word as Strelitzia Nicolai is a native of South Africa a world away from South Florida.


A Horse Named Boomer

 (Shane Srogi)


Barn Storm

 (Shane Srogi)


Of flowers and scars

Don’t give up.

A Magnolia can take 15 to 20 years to bloom.  I’ve only seen this little one bloom once and it has not since, which has been over a year.  I find the whites and the curves of the bloom to be visually interesting.  It’s as if Apple took some design cues from this flower.  This image is less about a plant and more about doing what you do.  You may only produce something beautiful once in a long while but don’t give up.  This little guy has been through three hurricanes and looks a bit like a Charlie Brown Christmas tree.  I like the blooms imperfections.  They tell stories.  I’ve got this scar on my hand from running for the bus in first grade.  I fell on the ice picked myself up and got on the bus.  The drive took one look at the rock in my hand and the blood gushing out and said “I can’t let you on like that.”  I didn’t know what to do….I can’t miss school I thought.  Next time you are out with a group of friends have a scar story time, you’ll learn something new about them.  And they you.


On the Ranch

For a decade now my family has run a ranch on the northern tip of the Everglades.  This ranch provides a home for rescue horses, dogs and the odd cat or two.  We are stewards of the land, care takers of the endangered Cypress.  The ranch is a habitat provider for Snail Kites, Alligators and a pathway between protected park lands for the Florida Panther.  We plant native species to provide cover and food for the wildlife and eliminate invasive one. Sometimes it feels like a tropical Ponderosa, the Cartwright’s never had to deal with Hurricanes.