Landscape and Nature photography by Shane Srogi

Archive for December, 2010

Remembering Kodachrome

 (Shane Srogi)

Remembering Kodachrome.  Shot in 1991 Volcanic Eruption of Mount Pinatubo produced some of the most spectacular sunsets I’ve ever witnessed (in 20 years of doing Landscapes).  I was just out of school, back in the West, and lucky enough to have a few rolls of Kodachrome to “try out.”


The thundering Rapid River in Washington State’s Cascade Mountains

 (Shane Srogi)

When I see this picture.  I feel thunder and cold water in a fine spray.  This is a hidden treasure.  A waterfall on the Rapid River with no trail to take you there.  I’ve been to the start of this river.  The first trickle of water off the melting snows high on the crest of the Cascades.  A bit of a hard slog and you know you are in bear-county as the trees show claw marks but finding this waterfall is worth the bush whack.  The river running fast and cold hits a slab of granite about the size of a football field.  There is a huge boulder in of the slab.  When the water hits it part of the river takes a 90 degree turn down this shoot.  To find this work your way up the bank of the Rapid and listen for the thunder.

When I moved to Seattle I started work with conservation organizations right away.  Clean water is something we all need and in Western Washington it’s visually measurable.  You can see the rivers.  You can see the snow pack in the mountains.  You know if it’s going to be a drought year.  The organization I partnered with formed from river runners.  Through their sport they knew the river intimately and knew they needed protection.  They sent me all over Washington State to photograph rivers in trouble.  You want to learn the land talk to the people that know the water.  Clean water is the most basic of needs.

-Shane


Rapid River, Washington State.

 (Shane Srogi)

When I see this picture.  I feel thunder and cold water in a fine spray.  This is a hidden treasure.  A waterfall on the Rapid River with no trail to take you there.  I’ve been to the start of this river.  The first trickle of water off the melting snows high on the crest of the Cascades.  A bit of a hard slog and you know you are in bear-county as the trees show claw marks but finding this waterfall is worth the bush whack.  The river running fast and cold hits a slab of granite about the size of a football field.  There is a huge boulder in of the slab.  When the water hits it part of the river takes a 90 degree turn down this shoot.  To find this work your way up the bank of the Rapid and listen for the thunder.

When I moved to Seattle I started work with conservation organizations right away.  Clean water is something we all need and in Western Washington it’s visually measurable.  You can see the rivers.  You can see the snow pack in the mountains.  You know if it’s going to be a drought year.  The organization I partnered with formed from river runners.  Through their sport they knew the river intimately and knew they needed protection.  They sent me all over Washington State to photograph rivers in trouble.  You want to learn the land talk to the people that know the water.  Clean water is the most basic of needs.

-Shane


Water Wednesday

 (Shane Srogi)

Welcome to Water Wednesday.  As I watched Chase Jarvis Live with Scott Harrison, founder of Charity: Water on Monday I was struck by the sheer number of people (1.1 billion) in the world without access to clean water.  More than that 80% of disease is due to poor sanitation.  We are faced with a famine of clean water.  This is the most basic of needs.  Clean water.  In the coming blogs I intend to post about my own experiences working toward clean water here in the States.  It’s an issue I started work on with non profits before I even because a professional photographer.

Every one of us should be asking what’s coming out of my tap.  This is a message of hope not of fear.  This is something we should work toward and a problem that can be solved.

Ever been on a grueling hike in 90 degree heat and taken a long drink of cold, clear water?  It’s a feeling of relief and joy.  Literally quenching ones thirst.  When hiking one of the greatest acts of generosity a friend can do is to offer you a drink, something they have carried for miles.  We can to that for everyone.

-Shane